capacity building school libraries logo.jpg

This two-day conference will be emceed by Karen Bonanno, Global Genius Educator/Leader, Genius School.

In ‘Learning and literacy for the future: Building capacity. Part Two’, June Wall and Karen Bonanno state, ‘As new learning skills emerge it is necessary for education systems to respond to make sure teachers have sufficient capacity to develop learning programs that will provide the opportunity for students to develop these new learning skills.’

In simple terms, capacity building can be described as a sustainable process of equipping teachers with the knowledge, skills and attitudes to enable them to cope with change and achieve the desired educational outcomes.

For our students to be successful in an increasingly global and connected society there is an ongoing need to provide relevant and future focused professional learning that helps to build capacity in teachers so they can actively engage students in new learning skills.

Highly experienced, well recognised presenters will share their expertise with the delegates. Just a few of the presenters including:

  • Dr Marcia Mardis

  • Dr Kay Oddone

  • Lori Korodaj

  • Nelia Manansala

  • Jackie Child

  • Holly Godfree

  • Helen Stower

  • Megan Daley


Tickets

Tickets can be purchased for an individual stream (half day), one or two days.
Each stream includes morning or afternoon tea.  Full day session also includes lunch.
Prices inc GST.

EARLY BIRD (ends 31 March 2019)
One Stream – $99
Full Day (2 Streams) – $220
Two Days (All Streams) – $440

STANDARD
One Stream – $115
Full Day (2 Streams) – $260
Two Days (All Streams) – $520

we will focus on four major themes:

  1. Addressing professional standards

  2. Creating engaging spaces

  3. Designing learning experiences

  4. Collaborating with parents


Target Audience

This conference is best suited to innovative classroom teachers, teacher librarians and those on the executive looking to build capacity at a school level or within the individual classroom. 


Australian Professional Standards for Teachers

This conference addresses the following Australian Professional Standards for Teachers:

1.2 – Understand how students learn
1.5 – Differentiate teaching to meet the specific learning needs of students across the full range of abilities
2.1 – Content and teaching strategies of the teaching area
2.5 – Literacy and numeracy strategies
2.6 – Information and Communication Technology (ICT)
3.1 – Establish challenging learning goals
3.3 – Use teaching strategies
3.4 – Select and use resources
3.7 – Engage parents/carers in the educative process
4.5 – Use ICT safely, responsibly and ethically
6.2 – Engage in professional learning and improve practice

 

STREAM 1 Program:

FRiday 31 MAy 2019 - Addressing professional standards


session 1:

9:00AM – 9:45am

Speaker: Dr Marcia A. Mardis, Professor and Associate Dean for Research, College of Communication & Information, Florida State University

 Marcia Mardis

Marcia Mardis

 

Keynote: Professional Standards: Building Capacity Among and For Teacher Librarians


Standards are the hallmark of a profession, but only if they are dynamic and support best practice and continuous growth. The history of teacher librarian (TL) professional standards development is an important backdrop against which new efforts to enhance TLs’ capacity should be examined. In this keynote, through an examination of TL milestones and the instrumental case of the new American Association of School Librarians National School Library Standards, Marcia will illustrate key learnings and chart a vital, central role for TLs in contemporary learning environments and beyond.


session 2:

9:50AM – 10:35am

Speaker: Dr Kay Oddone, Lecturer and Study Area Coordinator, Teacher Librarianship, Queensland University of Technology

 Kay Oddone

Kay Oddone

 

Professional Learning for Connected Teacher Librarians: Linking, Stretching and Amplifying


Teacher Librarians (TLs) use both online and offline connections to maintain and expand their professional knowledge and currency. Known as the PLN, or Personal Learning Network, this mode of professional learning allows TLs to enhance their knowledge and skills, develop a positive sense of self and advocate and educate others beyond their immediate context. However, developing and maintaining a PLN can be time-consuming, and managing effective learning within dynamic and constantly changing networks presents a challenge for TLs already responding to multiple demands.

This presentation presents a new and innovative way to understand and manage professional learning through the PLN.  Research exploring the experiences of 13 teachers from varied geographical locations revealed that interactions through a PLN involve complex connections which offer linking, stretching or amplifying learning experiences. Awareness of these learning experiences may empower teacher librarians to identify the strategies and online spaces that most closely align with their learning needs and goals, creating opportunities for transformative pedagogical, personal and public professional learning.

Participants can expect to leave this presentation with a fresh understanding of innovative, practice-based professional learning and insights into how linking, stretching and amplifying learning experiences create flexible, accessible and highly personal engagement within their PLN.


session 3:

11:00AM – 11:45am

Speakers: David McInnes, Principal and Debra McGhee, Teacher Librarian, St Teresa’s Catholic College, Noosaville

 David McInnes

David McInnes

 
 Debra McGhee

Debra McGhee

 

The everyday and the extraordinary


The partnership between leadership and the school library is vital to the successful implementation of initiatives to support reading and information literacy development. The annual Qld School Library Award for Outstanding Principal was awarded to Mr David McInnes from St Teresa’s Catholic College at Noosaville for his exemplary support for the College library, the library staff and collaborative school library programmes. David’s promotion and support of the library’s integral role in the school community is exceptional, and as such the library is an active partner in developing information literate students at St Teresa’s Catholic College. Teacher Librarian, Deb McGhee, is responsible for the planning, implementation and communication of successful library programming and activities. The library offers a vast range of opportunities for secondary students, catering for the academic needs of students, as well as many co-curricular activities and providing a haven of relaxation and wellbeing for those seeking respite from the busyness of school life. This session highlights the professional collaborations that make up the everyday library experiences of the College community, while celebrating the special and the extraordinary events and opportunities the library can provide.


STREAM 2 Program:

FRiday 31 MAy 2019 - Creating engaging spaces


session 1:

1:00pm to 1.45pm

Speaker: Angela Allen, Head of Library Services, Somerville House

 Angela Allen

Angela Allen

 

refurbished and revived: growing our potential


Refurbishments breathe new life into old spaces. In 2018 Seymour Library at Somerville House re-opened its doors after the completion of a ten month long refurbishment project. The joy and pride with which students and staff interact with Seymour Library is a testament to the design, construction and fit-out of the space, as well as the foresight of the project’s conception. The school community use the varied, flexible spaces in what is a modern and spacious library for collaborative learning, independent study, relaxation, research support and fostering stronger relationships. With much delight, students and staff have embraced the options available and more and more students feel welcome, nurtured and supported with their learning, reading for pleasure and their general wellbeing.

This refurbishment has provided Seymour Library with the opportunity to revise activities and services offered as well as its mission and vision. We are so much more than a book repository. The aim is to be that place students come for learning, relaxation and community. Seymour Library aims to be the heart of the school and strives to aid students in growing their potential, as we grow ours.


session 2:

1:50pm to 2.35pm

Speaker: Dr Terry Byers, Director of the Centenary Library and Innovation in Learning, Anglican Church Grammar School (Churchie)

 Dr Terry Byers

Dr Terry Byers

 

libraries as the academic heart of a school


There would be few educators or leaders who would (publically) disagree with the assertion that teacher librarians and school libraries are pivotal to the academic and social life of schools. Given this, then why are teacher librarians and libraries considered ‘optional extras’ when it comes to the budget, resourcing and funding. When we consider the evidence, much of it empirical, around the impact of librarians and libraries on reading and writing performance, let alone their broader social influence, the rationale behind this situation is peculiar; the more accurate explanation is that it’s ignorant, shortsighted and just wrong.

Given the pressure to survive, school libraries have become the hotbed of all things ‘innovation’. With the focus on libraries justifying their existence by changing their form and function, some could argue that they have moved away from their key functions. This presentation will focus on the eight-year journey that the Anglican Church Grammar School (Churchie) made to re-establish the Centenary Library as the academic heart of the school. It will outline how solidification of the core functions of the library and the role of its teacher-librarians have enhanced and expanded its core influence across the academic life of Churchie. The presentation will report on how the Centenary Library is championing and enriching the school’s reading culture and supporting teacher practice and professional development.


session 3:

3:00pm - 3.45pm

Speaker: Deb Ponting, Sessional Lecturer QUT in Masters of IT (Library and Information Science)/Master of Information Management (MIM)

 Deb Ponting

Deb Ponting

 

from library to centre for learning and innovation


This paper reports on the redesign of the library at a Preparatory to Year 12 (P-12) college, to a Centre for Learning and Innovation that supports collaborative learning and is an information hub for students and staff. The paper focuses on student and staff perceptions of how the new design has impacted on their use of the spaces within it. Read more about Download the report here.


STREAM 3 Program:

saturday 1 june 2019 - Designing learning experiences


session 1:

9:00AM – 9:45am

Speaker: Lori Korodaj, Teacher Librarian, Lake Tuggeranong College, ACT

 Lori Korodaj

Lori Korodaj

 

Keys to Success: Transforming Information & Digital Literacy for Students into 2020 and Beyond


With declining numbers of teacher librarians in P-10 schools to assist their teaching colleagues with delivery of the General Capabilities, many students are not mastering these skills before they come to Year 11.  TLs at Lake Tuggeranong College created the Keys to Success program to fill these gaps. Now in its fourth year, Keys to Success is delivered with a mixture of face to face and independent work via Google Classroom.  This allows 24/7 access to work for those students unable to attend and blends ‘traditional’ teaching with online delivery.

Lori will share how this program has developed over time and discuss the success that has come with new iterations.  Keys to Success is now not only offered to students at lunchtime, but will soon have a ‘drop-in’ stream, and be embedded into Year 11 English throughout in 2019.

With a very supportive principal and teaching colleagues, Keys to Success is now the ‘go-to’ program that teaching staff and student wellbeing co-ordinators recommend to students needing extra support to complete assessment tasks and gain valuable research skills.

This hands-on session will be useful to secondary school practitioners looking to fill the gaps for their students and for primary school practitioners with an eye on transitions who want their students to avoid those gaps in the first place.


session 2:

9:50AM – 10:35am

Speaker: Jackie Child, Junior School Technologies Coordinator/Teacher Librarian, St Aidan’s Girls School

 Jackie Child

Jackie Child

 

Enriching Learning in the Library through Technology


Our students live in a technological world and need to be supported in their learning with the new and exciting technologies constantly being developed. This session will share ways technology can be integrated into library programs to enrich learning, including; green screen filming, robotics, coding, invention kits, virtual reality, augmented reality, 3D printing, laser cutting and app smashing. Many of the ideas presented use books as a springboard to dig deeper into themes, characters, issues, plots, styles, concepts and to have ‘fun’ with stories. Technology is a very powerful tool to enhance learning and using a constructionist pedagogy it gives students opportunities to collaborate, create, communicate and think critically, skills for the 21st Century.


session 3:

11:00AM – 11:45am

Speaker: Nelia Manansala, Academic Talent Development Coordinator and e-STEAM Program Leader, Chisholm Catholic College

 Neila Manansala

Neila Manansala

 

seven ways to think like a 21st century personalised learning designer


In most educational settings, all students are expected to learn the same materials at the same time and in the same way. Nowadays advancement in technology is changing the way we learn in classes. Flexibility and delivery are creating opportunities that adapt to the learning needs of students. However, these are dependent on a learning ecosystem that tailors learning to individual needs of students including engagement. So, how do we scale personalised learning, so we can reach more learners? How do we make this learning ecosystem, so it becomes engaging, motivating and meaningful? Inspired by the Raworth’s concept of ‘Doughnut Economics’, educators can translate these principles in education and to think like an economist. The seven ways call on us to look into the shape of our Australian curriculum, get away from a lock-step curriculum and be driven by the learners’ own interests. This presentation shares the experiences within e-STEAM Academy, designed to customise the learning playlist of students ‘sitting in the back row’ and provide personalised learning combinations of experiences for the fractured learning landscape of the gifted and talented. e- STEAM embeds an induction into social enterprise learning to produce students who are agents of change.


STREAM 4 Program:

Collaborating with parents


session 1:

1:00PM – 1:45pm

Speaker: Holly Godfree, Campaign Coordinator, Students Need School Libraries

 Holly Godfree

Holly Godfree

 

Students Need School Libraries: A Personal and Professional Campaign


Do any of these sound familiar? “Kids today are different - they just ‘know’ how to do all that digital stuff.” Research is so much easier for students now with the internet making the world’s information freely available.”  “Wouldn’t it be smart to save money by having a school assistant loaning out the books instead of an expensive teacher librarian?”  “Nobody uses school libraries anymore.”

Holly Godfree will explain why these dangerously widespread assumptions are harming our children and contributing to Australia’s falling standards in international educational outcomes. You’ll find out what (and who) works in school libraries and why these factors are so important for all students. Most importantly, you will leave primed with practical ideas and bursting to take action to help young people around you by becoming a champion for their school library.


session 2:

1:50PM – 2:35pm

Speaker: Helen Stower, Program Leader iCentre, Mt Alvernia College

 Helen Stower

Helen Stower

 

All Aboard: Inviting Parents to Ride the School Library Train


The purpose of this presentation is to share the story of a school library that endeavours to embrace parent collaboration as an essential ingredient to building a vibrant community that supports the literacy and learning outcomes for students. The Mount Alvernia iCentre has concentrated on four key projects to connect with and engage parents. These include: * Social media channels * Read Like a Girl program – a community partnership that aims to build a love of reading among the students at Mount Alvernia College through a calendar of literature events * Parent Volunteer program * Parent Book Chat Breakfasts

This presentation will explore how the team in the iCentre implemented these projects and share the lessons learned, including: * the goals of the projects; * the steps taken throughout the projects; * the results of the projects; * the challenges encountered during the projects; and * future directions Participants can expect to leave the session with * An overview of how parent involvement can support & benefit school library services * Examples of strategies that can be used to engage parents in school libraries * Learnings from the teacher librarians involved in this process


session 3:

3.00pm - 3.45pm

Speaker: Megan Daley, Author, Blogger and Head of Junior Library at St Aidan’s Anglican Girls’ School

 Megan Daley

Megan Daley

 

Engaging Parents and the Community


More than ever, school library staff need to ensure they engage the entire school and local community, in ensuring they are a thriving learning environment and place of community engagement. As a Junior School teacher librarian working in a K-12 school with library staff over two campuses, Megan will take you through the many events and programs she runs for engaging the school and local community with both her Junior School Library and the literary culture of the entire school. As a blogger, social media connoisseur and regular presenter on radio, Megan has tips and tricks for networking with the wider literary community in your area in order to extend the offerings to your school community. At St Aidan’s Anglican Girls’ School, Megan hosts book clubs with parents and students, regular talks and workshops for parents and large and small scale literary events with authors, illustrators and creatives.